And the Answer Is. . .

One questions students are frequently asked is, “What’s your favorite subject?”.  As a student, I find myself faced with this question a lot.  I find that it kind of comes down to preference: like a photo, answers and general course of a subject falls into one of these three broad categories: clear, blurry, and the in-between.  What distinguishes each category varies from person to person, so I’ll be going into my take on each category.

The obvious example for a subject with a clear answer is math.  Often, there is only one right answer to a problem, though there may be many ways to solve a problem.  Personally, I find math really monotonous: I don’t naturally “think in math” and have little tolerance for trying to for extended periods of time.  I’m that one kid that obsessively checks how many problems he/she has left; it’s as tense as a rocket countdown.  Each number down represents one number closer to freedom.  Nevertheless, I can see the simple, elegant appeal of math to those who have the patience to sit down with it.  It’s amazing watching people solve things with ingenious simplicity; math teachers tend to do this effortlessly.  I’m mostly the kid on the side gaping in awe.

Thankfully, I don’t do my best gaping catfish impression for all of my school subjects.  In contrast, I find that participating in English class is a lot easier for me, which I attribute to the seemingly endless possibility of answers in English class.  Truly the number of answers to a question are not infinite.  Well scratch that, they kind of are, but quality answers are those strongly supported by ample textual evidence.  There is usually a widely accepted point of view, but there is no need to accept it.  Provided the case is strong enough, the analysis of any argument can be broken down and interpreted in many ways.

Though these two subjects are the relative extrema of the school subject spectrum, they are by no means the endpoints.  In the middle are all of the other subjects in school I have neglected to mention: history, physics, chemistry, economics.  Answers in all subjects are varying degrees of clarity.  It’s no so easy to define these subjects because different parts shift the subject on the spectrum.  Me?  I lean left towards open answers.  Or ambiguity; it all depends on how you see things.

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And the Answer Is. . .

Sleep and Your Average Teenager

This is a post I wrote on my other blog that I run with my friends. Give it a spin if it fits your fancy.

Come Down The Rabbit Hole

A few days ago, when I was sitting in one of my classes, a couple of students came in to take a survey on the average amount of sleep students get per night.  As they called out the choices (3-4 hours, 5-6 hours, so and on), we raised our hands.  When they had left our classroom, our concerned teacher asked us why we were not getting enough sleep.  We answered, jokingly and seriously, that we had taken too many AP classes, to which my teacher replied that we shouldn’t have taken so many if it was compromising our health.

Not too long ago, I was reading John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath, and I happened across an interesting passage:

“And the migrants streamed in on the highways and their hunger was in their eyes.  hey had no argument, no system, nothing but their numbers and their needs.  When there was…

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Sleep and Your Average Teenager

Why Have Hobbies?

Aunt Beulah

In a recent Peanuts cartoon, when Lucy told Charlie Brown she was thinking of starting some new hobbies, Charlie said, “That’s a good idea, Lucy. The people who get most out of life are those who really try to accomplish something.”

Looking appalled, Lucy replied: “ACCOMPLISH something? I thought we were just supposed to keep busy.”

In the past, I thought like Lucy. Viewing hobbies as busy work to fill my idle moments, I pursued decoupage, macramé, origami, tatting, and yodeling. Each endeavor enjoyed the same success as my wish to be 5’6”.Wreath

My search for a busy-work hobby peaked when I scoured fields and ponds for nuts, pinecones, grasses, and twigs, which I used to make Christmas wreaths. I gave these creations to loved ones, who exclaimed happily and hung them in their snug homes.

I had used liberal amounts of a smelly liquid adhesive to attach my found…

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Why Have Hobbies?

A Domain of One’s Own

Need to find something?  Just Google it.  Since its introduction to the public, going on the Internet has become synonymous with answers.  If we need something, we know that we don’t have to look through many heavy tomes to find what we’re looking for.

Pic creds to cvrcak1 on Flickr.
Pic creds to cvrcak1 on Flickr.

On passing whims, I tend to look up a lot of things and distract myself from what I’m actually doing (which is usually homework).  I think it’s really hard though, when one link seems to lead to another and to another.  By the time I reach the end of the line, I sometimes realize that I have spent hours surfing the Net and doing none of my homework!

Though it’s a great distraction, the Internet is something I wouldn’t choose to be apart from.  Yes the computer is bad for your eyes and yes it probably gives you cancer in some way, shape or form, but I get so frustrated when I can’t figure out the name of an obscure song that the minute I can, I try to look it up by using the one or two lines that I remember.  To me, solving these small, burning curiosities is one thing I’d keep the Internet around for.

To many people, the Internet is a form of self-discovery.  Among our chief pursuits on the Internet is an answer to the question: “What is our purpose in life?”  Well that’s no easy question, but maybe we can get started with a quiz from Quibblo, right?  The speed with which the Internet puts us in touch with the things we like, events, movies, and songs, can help us solidify our sense of self.  Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest help us share ideas and stay in touch with friends and family, distant and close.  Most of all, sites like DeviantArt and YouTube promote creativity, giving it a platform on which to present itself and perform/ make art happen.  The best examples of the growth that people undergo on these sites is best noticed by scrolling through the gallery page of DeviantArt artists or watching a bunch of YouTube videos by one person. It’s amazing watching someone’s artwork and style evolve over the years.  Similarly, old Youtube videos reveal different people at different times in their lives.  As time lapsed, the people changed as well, creating a small timeline for that person’s personality.  As we do with most things, we approach the Internet: wide-eyed, seeking answers.

Link to cvrcak1’s work: https://www.flickr.com/photos/29320956@N03/

A Domain of One’s Own