Identity Defined

Throughout this year, I have been trying to define myself as a person. Who am I?  What do I like? What do I want to do? What causes do I support? What do I believe in?

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Thankfully, I’m not the only person out there with these kinds of questions. A short snippet of Holden Caulfield’s life, chronicled in the Catcher in the Rye, has supported the idea that language creates identity. Continue reading “Identity Defined”

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Identity Defined

Too Long Didn’t Read (TLDR): College Is Expensive

For my English class, I recently completed an online college portfolio, a collection of documents useful in the college application process.  This included items such as a resume, entrance essay, and college search write-up, all of which I put into a folder in Google Drive justly titled, “College Portfolio”.  If you are a rising senior (or even perhaps a curious rising junior), I highly recommend this project because it helped me reflect on myself as a person and got me a head start on applying to college.   Continue reading “Too Long Didn’t Read (TLDR): College Is Expensive”

Too Long Didn’t Read (TLDR): College Is Expensive

And the Answer Is. . .

One questions students are frequently asked is, “What’s your favorite subject?”.  As a student, I find myself faced with this question a lot.  I find that it kind of comes down to preference: like a photo, answers and general course of a subject falls into one of these three broad categories: clear, blurry, and the in-between.  What distinguishes each category varies from person to person, so I’ll be going into my take on each category.

The obvious example for a subject with a clear answer is math.  Often, there is only one right answer to a problem, though there may be many ways to solve a problem.  Personally, I find math really monotonous: I don’t naturally “think in math” and have little tolerance for trying to for extended periods of time.  I’m that one kid that obsessively checks how many problems he/she has left; it’s as tense as a rocket countdown.  Each number down represents one number closer to freedom.  Nevertheless, I can see the simple, elegant appeal of math to those who have the patience to sit down with it.  It’s amazing watching people solve things with ingenious simplicity; math teachers tend to do this effortlessly.  I’m mostly the kid on the side gaping in awe.

Thankfully, I don’t do my best gaping catfish impression for all of my school subjects.  In contrast, I find that participating in English class is a lot easier for me, which I attribute to the seemingly endless possibility of answers in English class.  Truly the number of answers to a question are not infinite.  Well scratch that, they kind of are, but quality answers are those strongly supported by ample textual evidence.  There is usually a widely accepted point of view, but there is no need to accept it.  Provided the case is strong enough, the analysis of any argument can be broken down and interpreted in many ways.

Though these two subjects are the relative extrema of the school subject spectrum, they are by no means the endpoints.  In the middle are all of the other subjects in school I have neglected to mention: history, physics, chemistry, economics.  Answers in all subjects are varying degrees of clarity.  It’s no so easy to define these subjects because different parts shift the subject on the spectrum.  Me?  I lean left towards open answers.  Or ambiguity; it all depends on how you see things.

And the Answer Is. . .

Squiggle Stories

When I was in second grade, my teacher had a weekly writing assignment.  She would give us a piece of paper with a scribble of some sort on the page, and she asked us to draw a picture using the “squiggle”.  Then, we had to write a story about the picture.

She would give us something like this:

wpid-20141108_201310.jpg Continue reading “Squiggle Stories”

Squiggle Stories

SOAPSTone: 09/30 – 10/06

You may have noticed that my SOAPSTone posts vary in relevance to the actually “SOAPSTone-ing”: I’m usually not using SOAPSTone, but rather, just discussing an aspect of SOAPSTone.  Today (it’s actually almost tomorrow where I am), I’m going to talk about audience a bit. Continue reading “SOAPSTone: 09/30 – 10/06”

SOAPSTone: 09/30 – 10/06

The SOAPSTone of the Week: 09/07-09/14

To whom it may concern, SOAPSTone is, as defined by the Collegeboard, “a method for dissecting the work of professional writers.”  Arguably the “main point” of AP English language, SOAPSTone is something I’ll be using a lot this year, ergo I decided to implement SOAPSTone into my blog.

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Unfortunately, I’m not talking about this kind of soapstone; kitchen decor will simply have to wait.

Continue reading “The SOAPSTone of the Week: 09/07-09/14”

The SOAPSTone of the Week: 09/07-09/14

Pilot: First Episode in Blogging

I’ve never really understood what a pilot episode was.  Maybe “pilot” was an inside joke of some sort.  Maybe “pilot” was something everyone but me found catchy and cool.

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I finally caved in to my curiosity and looked up the definition of a pilot episode, which is a first episode used to test the waters, see who’s watching the series and predict if the show will sink or float in the vast sea of TV shows.  According to TIME Magazine’s “Ready for Takeoff: 10 Greatest TV Pilot Episodes”, a pilot episode “should intrigue you enough  to make you want to come back for the next installment.”  I guess a pilot episode hasn’t ever worked its magic over me then.  The only TV show I watch periodically is Jeopardy, which doesn’t have an episode explicitly titled “Pilot”.  It has a first episode of course, but it doesn’t have the “Pilot” episode and doesn’t come out with fancy, clever titles every episode like other TV shows.  Maybe the fact that Jeopardy is a game show is a significant detail.  Nonetheless, Jeopardy and pilot episodes aside, I needed something to start my blog. Continue reading “Pilot: First Episode in Blogging”

Pilot: First Episode in Blogging